quarta-feira, 24 de dezembro de 2008

S&S Tour - São Paulo 2008

video

Apenas algumas fotos até eu receber o restante delas :P
foi mara!
SP - 20.12
fotos madonnaonline

segunda-feira, 8 de setembro de 2008



“Ainda não tinha aprendido o quanto a natureza humana é contraditória; não sabia quanta hipocrisia existe nas pessoas sinceras, quanta baixeza existe nos nobres de espírito, nem quanta bondade existe nos maus.” - William Somerset Maugham
Passei por essa citação na internet ontem a noite e achei muito interessante, pq nunca havia parado pra pensar sobre isso.
Tudo fica mais verdadeiro se vc vê da forma como o Will aí em cima disse.






Essa é a vista de uma das entradas da minha cidade.. como é bom vê-la!

quinta-feira, 4 de setembro de 2008



Give it to me, yeah
nos vemos no Morumbi, Mah!
hauahau
Beijos


Babiiiiiiiiii, Betaaaaaaaa eu vou ver a Madonnaaaaa!
AAAAAAAAAAA!

quinta-feira, 31 de julho de 2008

quarta-feira, 2 de julho de 2008



pre-testing for cpe, i'm in the mood

quinta-feira, 26 de junho de 2008


O primeiro diálogo de Francês.. lembra?!


Dialogue de Français

(Nous parlons aux mobiles)

Jorge: Allô, Roberta??
Roberta: Oui, c’est Roberta!
Jorge: Bonjour! C’est Jorge! Comment ça va?
Roberta: Ça va et toi?
Jorge: Bien, merci. Tu es libre ce soir?
Roberta: Oui. Porquoi??
Jorge: Est-ce qu’on va au théâtre?
Roberta: Non! Je n’aime pas du tout le théâtre. Est-ce qu’on va au cinéma?
Jorge: D’accord, mais dans quel film est-ce qu’on va regarder?
Roberta: Quelque chose... vous choisissez!
Jorge: Est-ce qu’on va regarder “L’Histoire Sans Fin 2” ! ... Qu’en dites-vous??
Roberta: D’accord. Nous nous rencontrons six heures dans le cinéma Rex.
Jorge: D’accord! Au revoir! A bientôt!
Roberta: Au revoir!

(Dans le cinéma)

Jorge: Ici! Me voilà!
Roberta: Excusez-moi. Je suis en retard!
Jorge: Cela ne fait rien!

Roberta: Non monsieur, je suis au cinéma!!!
Jorge: Shhh, voilà!

Roberta: Quelle horreur!!!
Jorge: C’est détestable!!!!
Roberta: Est-ce qu’on va chez Liliane??
Jorge: Oui, c’est formidable. Liliane fait du chocolat!!!!!
Roberta: Allons Jorge!!!


FIN

sábado, 21 de junho de 2008

Aux armes, citoyens!
Formez vos bataillons!
Marchons! Marchons!
Qu'un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons!

terça-feira, 17 de junho de 2008

A foto fala por si. Muito stress hoje, então, essa é a minha dica: ache seu lugar feliz... mas com o rojão vermelho ao alcance!

quarta-feira, 11 de junho de 2008


A foto é do jornal. A edição é minha, apenas uma comemoração e uma discretíssima homenagem.

sábado, 7 de junho de 2008



Ah eu tinha escrito um texto enorme e esse blog apagou e agora eu fiquei com preguiça então fica pra próxima, vou ser mais suscinto!

Semana corrida: Exames de Cambridge na escola, aulas de francês na Unifran, amigas casando e falta de sono e de criatividade me atormentando.

Bom final de semana pra quem entrar aqui no meu cantinho pra ler as coisas que eu tenho pra dizer. Beijinhos

xxx jorginho xxx

quinta-feira, 22 de maio de 2008


dit qu'il ne me connaît pas.

domingo, 18 de maio de 2008

I'm giving top props to George A. Romero's Diary of the Dead for using a handheld digital camera to swat at the YouTube-ification of America. While Cloverfield wielded the woozy camera as a gimmick, Diary of the Dead gives it the center ring to ask a provocative question about the circus we call pop culture: What the hell out there is turning us into a nation of zombiefied peepers?
But first, for the uninitiated, a little Romero history. You don't need to study the Romero zombie canon to enjoy the fifth and latest in his series. But you could do worse. Romero's 1968 debut with the breakout zombie classic Night of the Living Dead was a gritty, low-tech wonder. Shot in unglam Pittsburgh — Romero is to that city what John Waters is to Baltimore — in black-and-white and with actors you've never heard of, this cult phenom (made for a piddling $114,000) still looks grungy-great. And something more: Smack in the middle of the civil rights era, Romero used a black actor (Duane Jones) as the hero and picked up props for being relevant. He hasn't lost his touch.
Social satire continues to figure in Romero's films with no sacrifice in blood-curdling scares. American consumerism took a hit as zombies roamed a shopping mall in 1978's Dawn of the Dead. Sexism went on the zombie fire in 1985's Day of the Dead. In 2005's Land of the Dead, zombies stood in for persons of interest in the post-9/11 zeitgeist. Romero told me recently, "I see something shitty happening in the world, and I slap some zombies on it." Good line, but Romero is shortchanging his talent. Even in his non-Dead films — catch 1988's Monkeyshines and 1993's The Dark Half — Romero creates muckraking mischief. And he's in rare form in Diary of the Dead, a stripped-down zombie epic in which he uses Toronto to stand in for Pittsburgh to save a few bucks. At sixty-eight, Romero is still a rampaging maverick.
The something shitty this time is our tendency to stick a camera in front of everyone and everything. As Debra (Michelle Morgan) tells Jason Creed (Joshua Close), her film-student boyfriend, "For you, if it's not on film it never happened." Romero's characters, in the process of making an amateur mummy movie outside Pittsburgh, find terror for real: The dead are rising up and looking to chow down on new victims. Rich-kid Ridley (Philip Riccio), who stars in the mummy rip-off, bolts for the family mansion. That leaves Jason and Debra to fend for themselves, along with a crew made up of film-freak Tony (Shawn Roberts), tech-head Eliot (Joe Dinicol), booze-hound Brit teacher Maxwell (Scott Wentworth) and Texas babe Tracy (Amy Lalonde), known for her ability to scream and jiggle on cue. As in most Romero movies, the actors are not likely Oscar candidates. But the rawness gives the movie just the right MySpace vibe, as does the documentary the crew makes, aptly titled The Death of Death.
The students try to make their getaway in a Winnebago, but zombies are persistent. Sequences abound in which laughs freeze the blood. Look out for the deaf, bomb-throwing Amish farmer, the overzealous National Guardsmen and the visit to Debra's home in Scranton, where family values include cannibalism. But the real mindblower goes down in a hospital, as Romero turns a place of safety and healing into a breeding ground for ravenous, drooling creatures who can be stopped only by blowing off their effing heads. (When I mentioned to Romero that universal cremation could put him out of the zombie business, he laughed like hell.)
Through it all, Jason keeps his camera rolling, showing the worst of us, such as two good ol' boys using zombies for target practice, an image that evokes Abu Ghraib in its intensity. Romero is asking us: Do we stop at the scene of an accident to help or to look? The best scary movies show the monster invading us from the inside. This one belongs with the leaders of the scare pack. Isn't it time that we give Romero his due? It's hardly an accident that Stephen King, Quentin Tarantino, Guillermo del Toro, Simon Pegg and Wes Craven recognize Romero as a master. He is.

sábado, 17 de maio de 2008


Estou com saudades. Me diga se recebeu a minha carta e se nossa viagem ainda vai acontecer.

segunda-feira, 12 de maio de 2008

Definitivo, como tudo o que é simples.

Nossa dor não advém das coisas vividas, mas das coisas que foram sonhadas e não se cumpriram.
Sofremos por quê? Porque automaticamente esquecemos o que foi desfrutado e passamos a sofrer pelas nossas projeções irrealizadas, por todas as cidades que gostaríamos de ter conhecido ao lado do nosso amor e não conhecemos, por todos os filhos que gostaríamos de ter tido junto e não tivemos, por todos os shows e livros e silêncios que gostaríamos de ter compartilhado, e não compartilhamos.
Por todos os beijos cancelados, pela eternidade.
Sofremos não porque nosso trabalho é desgastante e paga pouco, mas por todas as horas livres que deixamos de ter para ir ao cinema, para conversar com um amigo, para nadar, para namorar.
Sofremos não porque nossa mãe é impaciente conosco, mas por todos os momentos em que poderíamos estar confidenciando a ela nossas mais profundas angústias se ela estivesse interessada em nos compreender.
Sofremos não porque nosso time perdeu, mas pela euforia sufocada.Sofremos não porque envelhecemos, mas porque o futuro está sendo confiscado de nós, impedindo assim que mil aventuras nos aconteçam, todas aquelas com as quais sonhamos e nunca chegamos a experimentar.
Por que sofremos tanto por amor?
O certo seria a gente não sofrer, apenas agradecer por termos conhecido uma pessoa tão bacana, que gerou em nós um sentimento intenso e que nos fez companhia por um tempo razoável, um tempo feliz.
Como aliviar a dor do que não foi vivido? A resposta é simples como um verso:
Se iludindo menos e vivendo mais!!!
A cada dia que vivo, mais me convenço de que o desperdício da vida está no amor que não damos, nas forças que não usamos, na prudência egoísta que nada arrisca, e que, esquivando-se do sofrimento,perdemos também a felicidade.


A dor é inevitável. O sofrimento é opcional....



Carlos Drummond de Andrade

quinta-feira, 27 de março de 2008


É preciso ter tristeza. Tristeza não é ruim. Quase todo mundo só quer escutar musiquinhas alegres, ir dançar em lugares barulhentos, ficar falando o tempo inteiro. Porque eles tem medo da tristeza. Mas não é a tristeza que mata.

domingo, 9 de março de 2008

m'endormir


Ao dizer-se complementar, em conjugação com ordinário, quer-se significar tão somente que, na maioria dos indivíduos os estados de consciência alternam-se, complementando-se ordinária, periódica e regularmente.

segunda-feira, 28 de janeiro de 2008

The living in ‘The Dead’ - A social critic and a glimpse over this society Joyce criticizes


student: Jorge A. Capel, Letras Port. Ingl. Franc.


The techniques and themes of the modern novel were affected by social changes and a very different point of view towards the world. They knew an unprecedented series of innovations, starting from the subjects chosen until the way they were presented. These changes took the form of the two most important revelations of modern literature: the concept of “epiphany” and “stream of consciousness” technique. They were put in action by many of the twentieth century novelists, such as Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, being the most relevant.
The perspective from which the writer tells the story "The Dead'' is in the third-person limited point of view. Although the narrator describes the action of many of the characters and even situations of some events Gabriel does not witness, only Gabriel's thoughts are given. Joyce's writing style is also relevant when discussing the theme proposed.
In his short story ‘‘The Dead,’’ James Joyce symbolically presents his critical view of Dublin society, and it is noticeable that Joyce’s Irish experiences are essential to his writings and provide all of the settings for his fiction and much of their subject matter.
To better understand the society he criticizes it is important to know that in the nineteenth century the European society was essentially bourgeois and the literature was solidly anchored in this social world. Therefore, to understand the living and Joyce’s critics about the society he lived in, it is necessary to understand how this society worked and in what principles it was based on.
In that society women were represented as ideal Victorian ladies, who endured the ups and downs of life, in the name of a social code. Respectability was achieved only through marriage. Genuine love and respect had nothing to do with family, since the outside signs of respectability were more important, than its essence. By showing us Gretta feeling extremely sad and missing her young love, Joyce represented a danger to the institution of marriage and the fragile foundation of a false social system.
Leaving Dublin became a necessity to Joyce, because he was a strong supporter of the idea that the artist must be isolated from his object of inspiration, in order to ensure total objectivity – in this case, he thought he could have a better view of his country’s society if he had an outer view of it. He believed it would make him see the flaws everybody pretended not to exist.
As we get to the end, Michael Furey, the young man who died after thoughtlessly visiting his lover, Gretta, in spite of his serious illness changes the course of the story. This was, according to the norms of the society, something foolish and pointless. However, Joyce implies that by doing such a touching gesture, the young man acquires a hero-like aura: “Better pass boldly into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.” Achieving a kind of martyr’s status, so we could imply that Michael Furey becomes a danger to the lofty behavior considered to be distinguishing of a gentleman.
His stories represented a danger to the fragile balance of the time, because they pointed out that society was heavily flawed and that instead of trying to fix the flaws, it ignored them and, even worse, covered them up, under the pretext of tradition.
To guide this analysis it is important to set the time and place where I am going to begin establishing the connection between the living and the dead and which symbols Joyce uses to make this contradiction.
The story starts to get completely different after the hotel scene, in which a very well hidden secret from Gretta is told. At this point Gretta tells her husband Gabriel that she once had a young lover and that they were very close to each other at the time, but he ended up dying very young. Gabriel, of course, gets angry and we can notice from his thoughts and acts that he is deeply nervous. It all gets worse when he asks her ironically what he died of, and she tells him that she thinks he died for her. That simple phrase is enough to make Gabriel’s head ache with thoughts, and those thoughts go from Gretta’s love for him to his aunt Julia’s death, that, in his opinion, was about to happen. That very simple thought is enough to make him realize really meaningful things about life, and how, in the end, one by one, we are all becoming shadows.
From that conversation with his wife, Gabriel also discovers that all of that time he had played a very poor part in his wife’s life, or at least not as important of a part as the one played by Michael Furey, the man who died for Gretta’s sake. The most important thing about this event is that Gabriel finally sees that feeling love for someone is a lot more than what he feels for his wife, admitting that he had never felt he could die for any woman, and he was sure that what Michael felt was love. Love defines life and death in this tale as, to Gretta, at this point, Michael seems to be closer to her than Gabriel, so the love they both feel for her defines who is dead and who is alive for Gretta. Gabriel knows that his feelings for his wife were not as intense as Michael’s, and it unfolded his eyes to the truth, that we can all be either dead at some point to someone, even if we are not physically gone. Michael was gone, but his memory is Gretta’s mind was still very vivid and almost alive, not simply a shade as Gabriel himself says, but a full memory.
Joyce was one of the first writers to practice the mimetic style. Mimetic style—a style that mimics or imitates—does not report thoughts using objective language but shows the character's thoughts by using streams of consciousness, illustrating and representing, in the written form, a character’s inner thoughts and memories. It does not follow a sequential time line, and Joyce uses this technique to define and describe a character, from his very thoughts.
It is Gabriel’s thoughts and memories that make it possible for us to define the characters of Gabriel and Gretta, and after that define the concepts of life and death proposed by Joyce in the story.
The theme of the story is that of a spiritual paralysis which has seized a lifeless or "dead" society and of the vital effect in paradoxical contrast that the dead may have upon the living in urging them to a fuller self-awareness. Joyce believed that Dublin was the center of this paralysis, having spent his childhood there and then having compared it to the more liberal society of Paris. So comparing the symbolically living and the symbolically dead, the author works with the contrasting images of darkness and light, blindness and perception, cold and warmth, society at large and the individual experience, upper middle-class.
This might be the most important issue of Joyce’s story, because it shows symbolically how ‘the dead’ made Gabriel more aware of himself and what love meant for him. This may seem not very logical as ‘the dead’ could not actually ‘do’ anything to awaken that awareness, but the love Gretta described was alive enough to touch him and make him think of his feelings and what his concepts of love were.

Joyce uses these symbols of life and death not only to define the characters, as they become more self aware in the end of the story, but we could also infer that this alive/dead parallel implies all of his social critics as the fake society he describes is dead to some principles and there is this need of self awareness that they seem to lack. Joyce’s story pose more than just a “salutary danger” to society; they are a wake up call for everybody and not just Ireland. It brings forth all of society’s mistakes and flaws, with the visible intention of trying to correct them. It shouts to be heard and to make a difference.


“I am tomorrow, or some future day, what I establish today. I am today what I established yesterday or some previous day.”

sexta-feira, 25 de janeiro de 2008

Love defining life and death, in ‘The Dead’, by James Joyce.

Love defining life and death, in ‘The Dead’, by James Joyce.
by Jorge A. Capel


Love can define and be defined by many things. That is definitely one of the reasons why it is so difficult to talk about it and describe everything within its area. Therefore, everybody has read something about love at least once in his/her life, but James Joyce has made a difference by handling this theme graciously and from an unusual perspective in his tale ‘The Dead’.
For a better understanding of this theme it is necessary to understand the principles of the stream of consciousness, a term coined by James Joyce, which is the written representation of a character’s inner thoughts and memories, that doesn’t follow a sequential time line, defining and describing a character from those very thoughts. The identification of the stream of consciousness in Joyce’s text is of extreme importance, because, defining the characters of Gabriel and Gretta from Gabriel’s thoughts and memories, it is possible to realize how love defines the concepts of life and death proposed at the beginning.
To guide this analysis it is important to set the time and place where I am going to begin – The hotel scene. The story starts to get completely different after the hotel scene, in which readers are told a very well hidden secret from Gretta. At this point Gretta tells her husband Gabriel that she once had a young lover and that they were very close to each other at the time, but he ended up dying very young. Gabriel, of course, gets angry and we can notice from his thoughts and acts that he is deeply nervous. It all gets worse when he asks her ironically what he died of, and she tells him that she thinks he died for her. That simple phrase is enough to make Gabriel’s head ache with thoughts, and those thoughts go from Gretta’s love for him to his aunt Julia’s death, that, in his opinion, was about to happen. That very simple thought is enough to make him realize really meaningful things about life, and how, in the end, one by one, we are all becoming shadows.
From that conversation with his wife, Gabriel also discovers that all of that time he had played a very poor part in his wife’s life, or at least not as important of a part as the one played by Michael Furey, the man who died for Gretta’s sake. The most important thing about this event is that Gabriel finally sees that feeling love for someone is a lot more than what he feels for his wife, admitting that he had never felt he could die for any woman, and he was sure that what Michael felt was love. Love defines life and death in this tale as, to Gretta, at this point, Michael seems to be closer to her than Gabriel, so the love they both feel for her defines who is dead and who is alive for Gretta. Gabriel knows that his feelings for his wife were not as intense as Michael’s, and it unfolded his eyes to the truth, that we can all be either dead at some point to someone, even if we are not physically gone. Michael was gone, but his memory is Gretta’s mind was still very vivid and almost alive, not simply a shade as Gabriel himself says, but a full memory.
Joyce is very competent in talking about people’s feelings. Everybody is a bit like Gretta. Who is the one who has not lost a father, a mother, an aunt, a grandparent? The love we feel keeps them alive and that is exactly what Joyce meant to emphasize, that people can be dead to us even being physically present, and, like in his story, love is what makes us define who is and who is not dead and alive to us.
To conclude, James Joyce brings up a relation in which we tend to ignore, sometimes even for our own good, the relation we all have with life and death, and how we can always be surrounded by dead people.